In the Land of the Head Hunters 1914

in the land-of-the-head-hunters-poster

In the 1910s, American Civil War veteran Edward S. Curtis spent several years living among a tribe of Native North Americans in British Columbia, documenting their many traditions in both photographs and film. Drawing on tribal folktales and ceremonial dances, and using a cast of Kwakiutl Indians as his actors, Curtis tells the story of brave Motana, who battles a fierce sorcerer and his warrior brother to earn the affections of the lovely maiden Naida.
Initial release: December 7, 1914 (USA)
Director: Edward S. Curtis
Story by: Edward S. Curtis
Cinematography: Edmund August Schwinke
Distributed by: World Film Company
Cast: Maggie Frank, Mrs. George Walkus, Stanley Hunt, Balutsa,

 

Max on the briny (Max a Monaco), 1914

max on the briny

“An exceedingly funny comedy written and acted by Max Linder, showing the extremely ludicrous adventures of an intoxicated man aboard a yacht. It is burlesque comedy of the lowest order, but absolutely clean and without the slightest trace of vulgarity. Laughable from start to finish. E.” (The New York Dramatic Mirror, April 21, 1915).
Premiered in Luxemburg on July 11, 1914, released in the US on May 5, 1915. The “unbilled” actress, appearing in the opening scenes, is believed to be Lilian Greuze.

 

Run time 12 minutes 59 seconds

 

 

 

Max and the Lady Doctor (Max et la doctoresse), 1914

Max and the lady doctor

Pathe comedy by Max Linder, who wrote, directed and starred in it.

“Max makes love to the lady doctor, who, of course, cannot forbid his visiting her, and we see him married later to the lady, but each time he starts to embrace she is called away to treat a sudden patient. Finally he kicks all the patients out of the office and domesticity reigns supreme”. F. (The New York Dramatic Mirror, Dec. 9, 1914)

Note: The IMDB gives 1909 as release date. That has proven to be wrong, when film historian Henri Bousquet published his ‘Catalogue Pathe des annees 1896 a 1914’ in 1995.
Max did star however in an earlier version “Le mari de la doctoresse” (Lady doctor’s husband) in late 1907, but no print of that film seems to has survived.

Director: Max Linder
Writer: Max Linder
Stars: Max Linder, Lucy d’Orbel, Georges Gorby

The Bargain 1914

The Bargin

After the bandit Jim Stokes robs the stage he is wounded fleeing. Recuperating at a ranch, he falls in love with and marries the daughter. Now wishing to go straight he tries to return the money but is recognized and captured. When the Sheriff then loses the recovered money at a crooked roulette table, he and Stokes strike a bargain.
– Written by Maurice VanAuken <vanauken@comcast.net>

 

Initial release: 1914
Director: Reginald Barker
Screenplay: Thomas H. Ince
Stars: William S. Hart, J. Frank Burke, Clara Williams
Cinematography: Joseph H. August, Robert Newhard
Distributor: Paramount Pictures

 

The False Max Linder (Un idiot qui se croit Max Linder), 1914

the false max l

Comica/Pathe production, written and directed by Romeo Bosetti. Starring Jules Vial, Romeo Bosetti.

“A somewhat original comic trifle, dealing with the endeavours of an imitation Max Linder to win fame by the methods of the great original. Needless to say, he is a very inferior imitation and, his spuriousness having been discovered, he suffers badly at the hands of those he has attempted to deceive.” (The Bioscope, Oct. 15, 1914)

 

 

Note: Although the film was made by Romeo Bosetti as part of the “Gaetan”-series, and Linder features only in an excerpt from one of his films; due to the title, it was regarded as being a part of the Max Linder filmography, right from the first release.
An interesting side note: Jules Vial was not the only impostor seen in this film. The publicity photos, used in the film, showed neither Max Linder nor Jules Vial, but the actor Andre Sechan. He was about to start a career as a Max “double” at the time of this film.

 

Max and his Mother-in-law (Max et sa belle-mere), 1914

Max and his mother in Law

Pathe comedy by Max Linder, “the Motion Picture’s first truly international Star” (Jack Spears, 1965), who wrote, directed and starred in this film, alongside Paquerette as “mother-in-law”.

“A young man, newly married, has great difficulty in getting rid of his mother-in-law, she even going so far as to accompany them on their honeymoon. They go to the Swiss Mountain resort. The things that that poor mother-in-law is made to do are legion, and all of them funny, including a session on the ice, a catastrophe on the coasting hill, and an extremely exciting and ludicrous performance on skis. She is so battered up by this latter performance that she is forced to receive medical attention, and the lovers are at last able to have some time to themselves.” (The New York Dramatic Mirror, August 4, 1915)

Note: The date in the opening title is wrong. Apparently this print was released before film historians found out that there are two different films with the same title. For more information you can go to my website: http://www.maxlinder.de

Directors: Max Linder, Lucien Nonguet
Writer: Max Linder
Stars: Max Linder, Léon Belières, Charles de Rochefort

 

 

 

The sign of the cross 1914

The Sign_of_the_Cross_(1914_film)_poster

The Sign of the Cross is a 1914 American drama silent film directed by Frederick A. Thomson and written by Wilson Barrett. Wikipedia
Initial release: December 21, 1914 (USA)
Director: Frederick A. Thompson
Screenplay: Wilson Barrett
Story by: Wilson Barrett
Production company: Famous Players Film Company
Cast: William Farnum, Ethel Grey Terry, Charles E. Vernon,