Oldest Footage of London Ever

From Yestervid

Ever wonder what London looked like over 100 years ago?

This is the oldest footage of London ever. Includes amazing old footage, plus modern shots of the same location today. Also features maps carefully researched to show where the camera was.
http://www.yestervid.com

 

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The video features:

  • 46 vintage shots of recognizable places in London from 1890-1920
  • Added dates and maps to show where the camera was
  • Amazing side-by-side comparison with modern footage of exactly the same spot
  • The clip that is the oldest surviving footage of London from 1890.

Here’s the film:

As far as we know, a project of this nature and factual depth has never been undertaken.

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We also love the feeling of seeing the horse drawn carts, people and old buildings. Nostalgia makes you reflect on your own life and leaves you with a sense of wonder because essentially, this is your story.

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In March 2015, old footage was researched and collected from various credible sources. The original shots were then recreated by visiting sites across London. The footage was carefully matched up, arranged by location, dates and other facts were researched, maps and some great aerial photos were added, and it was finished off with a classy soundtrack.

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Praise for ‘Oldest Footage of London’:

“Breathtaking film” – Ramzy Alwakeel, London Evening Standard
“Worth sharing” – Londontopia.net
“Remarkable video” – Paul Vale, Huffington Post UK
“Love the Video!” – David Clack, TimeOut
“Deeply moving” – Jonathan Kruk, Storyteller
“Amazing beautiful work… I absolutely love your channel” – Sueb Raschio

 

The Open Road 1926

7.7/10 · IMDb

the open road

 

The Open Road is an interesting travel piece of a road trip from Land’s End to John O’Groats. Claude Friese-Greene started to record a car journey covering the length of Britain on film. Primarily considered as a perfect promotional tool for his emerging color film process, whereby alternate frames were tinted red and blue / green, Greene’s journey brought the countryside to life, enlightening natural color to an audience used to black and white. Initially planned to be shown weekly in cinemas, the 26 short episodes were combined to form an exclusive documentary of life in Britain between the wars. Now digitally renovated by the BFI, this compilation of highlights is a perfectly watchable flick. Opening in Land’s End, Greene’s journey takes in Plymouth, a hunt on Exmoor, the docks in Cardiff, and pleasure beach at Blackpool. In Scotland, Greene records shipbuilding on the Clyde, the banks of Loch Lomond, and Stirling and Edinburgh Castles, before returning to London.

 

Upstream 1927

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Previously thought lost, the film was found in 2010 stored in a New Zealand film archive. According to a June 07, 2010 article in the Los Angeles Times, Upstream, unlike several other films found in the same cache, was considered so valuable, its restoration was carried out in New Zealand before it had several copies shipped to the US. The restoration was funded by 20th Century-Fox–whose predecessor, Fox Films, originally produced the picture.

This John Ford film centres on a boarding house that is home to actors and various other performing artists.  When one of the gets asked to perform Hamlet in London, the boarding house troupe is thrilled and sends him off joyously. But how will they react when success goes to his head?

 

Director: John Ford
Screenplay: Randall Faye
Story by: Wallace Smith
Awards: National Society of Film Critics Film Heritage Award

Stars: Nancy Nash, Earle Foxe, Grant Withers

 

 

London After Dark 1926

Short documentary

 

This rare film of stage actor and later cinema star Tod Slaughter opens with a view of St Paul’s over the river and the bright lights of Piccadilly at night. Then we’re off to the old Elephant Theatre on the New Kent Road, where Tod *Slaughter stars in a military melodrama. After the show, the film ends with a look at the Rowton House in Southwark, a hostel for the poor much admired by George Orwell.

  • Interesting for horror fans is that is shows Tod Slaughter treading the boards at the old Elephant Theatre. Slaughter became known for playing the dastardly villains in many melodramas including the infamous Sweeney Todd.

The Dancers 1925

The dancers 1925

Young Tony, unable to make a living in crowded and fast-paced London, goes to South America in search of his fortune. He soon becomes the owner of a saloon and dance hall. One of the dancers in his place, Maxine, falls in love with him, but Tony is still in love with his childhood sweetheart Una, although Una is now a “party girl” back in London and has forgotten about Tony. However, Tony comes into an unexpected inheritance, along with a title, and returns to London for Una. Although disappointed with Una’s current lifestyle, he asks her to marry him despite her “indiscretions”. However, the night before they are to be married Una confesses a deep, dark secret to Tony that could change their lives forever.
– Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Director: Emmett J. Flynn
Writers: Edmund Goulding, Viola Tree (play)
Stars: George O’Brien, Alma Rubens, Madge Bellamy

or

click on link below to view

https://mega.nz/#!kEIinQAA!e18kCsSijs9iWOq7Nzl6DYW0i9thHsOaFeDhvgYjFQE