Race Symphony 1928

Rennsymphonie (original title)

Hans Richter (April 6, 1888 — February 1, 1976) was a painter, graphic artist, avant-gardist, film-experimenter and producer. He was born in Berlin into a well-to-do family and died in Minusio, near Locarno, Switzerland.

‘Race Symphony (1928)’ belongs to a different style of film-making, most popular popular in the 1920s, known loosely as “City Symphonies.” Documentaries such as ‘Berlin: Symphony of a Great City (1927)’ and ‘The Man With a Movie Camera (1929)’ celebrated the working-class mechanics of society, often shunning intertitles and instead using diverse optical effects – such as double-exposures, dissolves, split-screen and slow-motion – to communicate story and mood. Richter’s entry runs just seven minutes, and documents a typical day at the German races, where sophisticated people turn up in droves to place a bet, watch the horses and celebrate a well-deserved win.

Director: Hans Richter
Writer: Hans Richter

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Author: Old Boy

Love the past and the future but live in the present